twisteddoodles:

'if at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

(via asapscience)

ucresearch:

The silly logic that congress has about climate change

You may have already seen the full segment on The Daily Show (you should if you haven’t) where John Stewart critiques a recent hearing held by the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology. It echoes a commencement speech that President Obama gave last spring at UC Irvine:

Today’s Congress is full of folks who stubbornly and automatically reject the scientific evidence about climate change.  They will tell you it is a hoax, or a fad.  One member of Congress actually says the world is cooling. There was one member of Congress who mentioned a theory involving “dinosaur flatulence”—which I won’t get into.

As for the ice in the glass concept, mounting evidence finds large swaths of land ice melting into the ocean.  A recent study that incorporates 40 years of observations from a joint effort with NASA and UC Irvine has found that the West Antarctic glacier will contribute to a 4 foot rise in sea level.  

You can read more about that study here →

skunkbear:

Beautiful reconstructed hominin skulls — the early members of humanity’s family tree! You can see lots more on the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Flickr page.

(via asapscience)

huffingtonpost:

Are Nasty Comments Like These Keeping Women Out Of Science?

"It’s death by a thousand cuts. Every day you’re faced with some comment, some snide remark, some inability to get a name on a research paper. And with an accumulation of those experiences, women tend to walk with their feet."

Go here to read more infuriating stories about women in science. 

(via asapscience)

jtotheizzoe:

Watch A Writhing Aurora in Real Time

I love me some auroras. They are the visual manifestation of an invisible force field, tongues of light that illuminate Earth’s magnetic shell, which by shielding this blue orb from the onslaught of the charged radiation known as solar wind, makes life itself possible.

As charged particles belched from the sun strike our planet’s magnetic carapace, they are diverted poleward on electromagnetic conduits and eventually thrust into the upper atmosphere at Earth’s higher latitudes. There, collisions with atmospheric molecules illuminate the sky in green and red atomic excitation spectra. Their downward orientation makes them appear like needles pushing in from space itself, or as if one was gazing upward at a flag flapping vertically in the wind.

None of that have I ever witnessed with my own eyes, because I live at far too equatorial a latitude for even the largest solar storm to deliver this show to my front door. In learning about auroras through time lapses and astrophotography, which I have done my fair share of here on It’s Okay To Be Smart, I suppose I’ve always assumed they were a slow, gradual thing to behold, moving alomst imperceptibly, but definitely moving, like the way we can watch a cloud dissipate without ever really seeing it happen.

This video of a recent aurora over Yellowknife, Canada tells a different story. It is moving in real time. Stunning work from photographer Kwon O Chul. Not every aurora moves this fast, but this video completely changes the way I look at auroras.

I’ve often thought of the auroras as Earth’s own performance art, as if the sun is thanking us nightly for the simple act of noticing. But for this private light show, it is we who should be thanking the sun.

For more beautiful aurora science check out one of the first videos I ever made for the It’s Okay To Be Smart YouTube channel

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!

The Physics of Space Battles

This week I strapped on my helmet, jumped in my handy starfighter, and used up It’s Okay to be Smart’s entire special effects budget so we could take a look at some of the physics at play when it comes to space battles.

How would spacecraft maneuver without terrestrial aerodynamics? In a zero-g environment devoid of atmosphere, what kinds of weapons might they use? And how do we overcome the fact that space is really, really, REALLY big? Join in the comments on the YouTube page and let me know if you think any of your favorite science fiction gets it right (or wrong).

Join me and Obi-Wan Newton to discover the Physics of Space Battles! Watch here: 

adventuresinchemistry:

I know this is horrifically late, but I made one of these for the science side of tumblr!

(via asapscience)

peregrinestar:

I did a thing in class today while the teacher was lecturing.

(via asapscience)

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE